corporate politics

Performance appraisals that aren't terrible

Performance appraisals that aren't terrible

It's that time of year! Performance appraisal season. There is plenty of confusion and dread about this process. How do you make it most useful? The best way to approach it: 1) Measure outcomes; 2) measure leadership behaviors; 3) get feedback from others. 

Scaling your leadership

Scaling your leadership

Stepping into a much larger role is exciting and nerve-wracking. It requires you to expand yourself - to get as big as the new job. You need to scale your leadership. That may sound good, but what does that really mean? Three things to do: Three tools for you: 1) Set the big picture; 2) Scale your communication; 3) Reshape your network. 

Getting buy-in for your ideas

Getting buy-in for your ideas

When you want to do something innovative, you have to get buy-in from the people around you. It doesn't just happen! Three tools for you: 1) Build alliances in advance; 2) Start small; 3) Appeal to their interests. 

Surviving organizational changes

Surviving organizational changes

Reorgs happen. So do mergers, integrations, and re-assignments. Whenever you get a new set of stakeholders you have to fine-tune your influence strategy, even if you are the boss. Three tools for you: 1) Draw a map; 2) Develop a strategy; 3) Teach your people

Earning the right to drive change

Earning the right to drive change

Being smart and great at your job is only part of the equation for success - and not the biggest part. You also need to have credibility and the support of those around you. Getting that support - especially if, sadly, you have alienated people already - takes effort. Three tactics to help: 1) Get sponsors; 2) Create positive buzz; 3) Challenge productively. 

Building your business confidence

Building your business confidence

Having business confidence is essential to getting you to the executive ranks and making you successful once you are there. Confidence has two related but distinct aspects: feeling confident and coming across as confident. Three tools will help you get both: 1) increase your knowledge base; 2) get validation; 3) stand your ground. 

Influencing your enemies

Influencing your enemies

Enemies, rivals, antagonists. The hard truth about corporate life is that now and again you find yourself on the wrong side of someone. And yet, you still have to work with them productively. Learn to influence your enemies: 1) Communicate openly; 2) Do them favors; 3) Influence those around them. 

Getting out of your comfort zone

Getting out of your comfort zone

The most important thing you can do for your career growth only happens when you find ways to learn new skills. At the senior levels, these are mostly subtle, and rather than requiring a class, they force you to step out of your comfort zone. Even though this is a cliche, it's not so easy. Today's article focuses on 3 tools to help: 1) Commit to being uncomfortable, 2) practice new skills, 3) create opportunities. 

Strategic conversations

Strategic conversations

High-stakes conversations are a fact of life at the executive level. If you are strategic about them, you will be more likely to influence the outcome for the better. Today's article gives you three steps to be more influential in a strategic conversation: 1) define your goal; 2) listen to the voices in their head; 3) create your strategy. 

How to have a better fight

How to have a better fight

Conflict. So many people think that they have to contain conflict, resolve conflict and prevent conflict. And, if they would only hone their influence skills, they could prevent conflict. Wrong. Today's article underscores that 1) conflict is inevitable, 2) so make sure you pick the right fight, and 3) learn from the experience.