decision making

Be a Better Delegator.

People at start-ups have to scale, but so do managers at large companies! The same mindset applies here, especially around finding the right people and delegating to them.

Here are 3 must-dos for effective delegation:

  1. Explain context. Don't tell people what to do, tell them what the outcome needs to look like and why. That way they can make good decisions in the right direction.

  2. Mid-point check-in. When you've delegated a large project, have them let you know when they will set up time with you to check-in, so you can review their progress.

  3. Debrief. At the end of a project you've delegated reserve time to review how it went and, most importantly, lessons learned. The key to increasing people's capacity - and being able to delegate more - is for them to learn as rapidly as possible. Debriefing accelerates this process.

I would love to hear what tools you use to become a better delegator!

You're bought in to scaling yourself, and you know you need to be a better delegator. Check out these common delegation mistake for you to avoid.

Three small habits that will yield big results

Small habits are easy to implement and yield big rewards. Pick one of these habits to start this winter. I would love to hear your results!

  1. Prepare for tough moments. Think through controversial meetings in advance: who might challenge you? What might they say? What will you say in response? You actually can predict what tough things will come up if you sit down and think about it. Systematically planning for difficult interactions or tricky situations will make you brilliant when they do come up, rather than thinking of the perfect remark six hours later.

  2. Make quicker decisions. Many people get paralyzed thinking they need more data. Practice making a quick decision. Quick decision-making is a key executive skill, and research shows that it is more effective to make quick decisions and course correct as you go than to collect more and more data and put off decision-making.

  3. Work on strategic projects first. Obviously this will get you to do more strategic things more often. Accomplishing high value things also boosts dopamine, a neurotransmitter in your brain - the same one you are flooded with when you are in the early stage of love. Talk about putting you in a good mood!

Getting Out of Your Head

Getting Out of Your Head

Getting out of your head is one of the toughest challenges you face as a founder/CEO. You have to wade through your own unproductive voices and make sure you communicate clearly and regularly with your team. It's a good time of year to remind yourself of this. I hope you enjoy this encore newsletter, which was also just featured on OpenView

Managing yourself in tough situations

Managing yourself in tough situations

It happens to all of us. We screw up something and then have to fix it. Often "fixing it" means having a tough conversation. Many people don't like to do that, and they certainly don't like anticipating it. Here are three tools for you to help set yourself up for success: 1) Learning lab; 2) Label; 3) Forgive yourself. 

Scaling your leadership

Scaling your leadership

Stepping into a much larger role is exciting and nerve-wracking. It requires you to expand yourself - to get as big as the new job. You need to scale your leadership. That may sound good, but what does that really mean? Three things to do: Three tools for you: 1) Set the big picture; 2) Scale your communication; 3) Reshape your network. 

Managing your career transition

Managing your career transition

You've put your time into your functional area, you've achieved some success, and then sometimes it hits you: you want something broader, something more, something different. It's time to transition your career! Even though you might feel daunted, there are ways to do that, even when you are advanced in your career. Three tools for you: 1) Build your skills; 2) Translate your experience; 3) Engage your network. 

Getting buy-in for your ideas

Getting buy-in for your ideas

When you want to do something innovative, you have to get buy-in from the people around you. It doesn't just happen! Three tools for you: 1) Build alliances in advance; 2) Start small; 3) Appeal to their interests. 

Surviving organizational changes

Surviving organizational changes

Reorgs happen. So do mergers, integrations, and re-assignments. Whenever you get a new set of stakeholders you have to fine-tune your influence strategy, even if you are the boss. Three tools for you: 1) Draw a map; 2) Develop a strategy; 3) Teach your people

Small changes drive big results

Small changes drive big results

The new year brings big resolutions. But, the truth is that small course corrections are your best bet to actually make progress. Today's article focuses on the framework to make a powerful small change stick: 1) Pick a high-leverage change; 2) Get specific; 3) Make it a habit. 

Thinking fast on your feet

Thinking fast on your feet

Some people are naturally fast on their feet; the rest of us need to develop that skill. The best way to ensure you find the right ways to handle difficult moments and political environments is to plan. Today's article focuses on planning for three scenarios: 1) Moving forward your agenda; 2) Reacting to negative comments; 3) Giving in gracefully.